new interview on watmm

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Dayvan Cowboy
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not sure if this has been posted already, but i've never read it before:-

edit: it's actually not new, it's from 2002.

complete 2002 interview from this journo's blog:
http://blogs.lesinrocks.com/j-ghosn/ind ... -canada#co



What are your earliest musical memories ?

Mike: I remember annoying my family by playing tunes on my grandparents' piano all day. I had a mostly happy childhood, always getting into trouble, which is probably a good way to learn about the world. I remember when I was very little playing in a park and an older girl told me that worms were born inside the veins on the leaves on trees, and I believed her.
I've been in love with music since I was a baby, it's very hard to remember a specific time. I can remember when I was a toddler standing up on the back seat of my parent's car singing songs at the top of my voice. The earliest record I can remember hearing on the radio was Terry Jacks' version of 'Seasons in the Sun', which was in the charts at the time.
I started to make my own music when I was about 5 or 6 years old, because my grandparents had a piano and I used to beg my parents to let me go there to play it. I didn't do formal lessons at that time, so I just made tunes up.


How did you start BOC ?


Marcus: About twelve years ago we were using a few different names for our projects, as we had a live band with guitars, as well as recording electronic things as side projects. One of the projects was Boards of Canada, named after the National Film Board of Canada, because we used to watch the documentaries made by the National Film Board and the music was usually synth-based and had a distinctive 'damaged' quality. I think perhaps the tapes they mastered the soundtracks on were poor quality, and the music had drop-outs and 'wow and flutter', which inspired our sound.

Marcus: We've always been quite prolific and back then all that mattered to us was to give all our friends copies of our music, so we started making up tapes and packaging them, and circulating them. It was just for the love of it so we never asked anyone to pay for them. We were struggling to raise cash to do it so we worked in crappy day-jobs. We started to set up our studio and it meant we needed to somehow get our music out to more people so we could fund what we do. It was mostly a fun time but we had some very tough years. In 1993 we all suffered and had a terrible year for various personal reasons, and everything nearly went down the drain. But somehow we kept on with recording and playing local gigs and things got a lot better.
We recorded a sort of mini-album called 'Twoism', for the first time with the intention of sending them to bands we liked. We got 100 copies pressed on vinyl with our own cash. I think we only gave away about 50 copies in the end, to a few bands and friends and so on. One of the copies went to Autechre, and Sean Booth called us up the day after we sent it, and asked us to do a record with Skam, which they were involved with. Then we made an EP with Skam, and then Warp called us up, and we decided to make an album to be released jointly by both labels, in 1998, which turned into 'Music Has the Right to Children'.


Are you workaholics ?

Mike: Yes I'd say we are. I suffer from insomnia too which doesn't help. We spend a hell of a lot of our time writing music, and only a small amount of what we record gets released.

Marcus: We usually work on tracks in parallel, several at once. Some of the tracks on 'Geogaddi' were started in 1999 then re-visited later and finished in 2001. Some of the tracks on 'Music Has the Right…' were recorded two years before it was released. We sometimes work intensively on one track for about a month or so. An average day when we're in the studio is something like 15 hours of work. We often go for about a week doing that, and then we just snap and have to get out before we kill ourselves.


How do you compose your tracks ? Is there a method ?


Mike: I find it very easy to write tracks. I write tunes all the time. I have music playing in my head all the time. I think it's a part of the reason for my insomnia. I'll run out of life long before I run out of music.

Why do you avoid most public appearances ?

Marcus: Ha, we're not particularly shy… We just feel more in control of what we're doing if we keep everyone away from us. We're not really hermits as some people seem to think. We have a lot of friends and we do a lot of other things besides this music. We got involved with music years ago because we love the music, we've never had any desire to become famous or to push ourselves on people. We love doing what we do, and we intend to carry on making music for many years, so it's important that we keep it at a level where we don't feel that it is putting too much pressure on our lives. It's also important to us not to take it all too seriously.

Mike: To some extent, we believe that getting well known for your music is a toxic thing for the band. People start to feel that they own you and your music, and they get very particular about what they want you to do. It can become claustrophobic. So the way we deal with it is to keep everyone and everything at arm's length. We've not allowed ourselves or our lives to change at all since the band became better known. It's much better this way. Somehow we write much better music when we don't imagine anyone hearing it. I'm not sure why this works but it does. It's cool because we keep ourselves inspired just like the early days when nobody had ever heard our music.

Marcus: Yes that's just it. When we started out we spent years playing music in the 'standard band format' of drums guitars and voices. Our backgrounds in music are very different from what we're doing in Boards of Canada. We were never DJ's or whatever, and we didn't come to electronic music from the computer side of things. When we first got into electronics in the mid-1980's we would record all the parts by hand, we didn't have sequencers. So it makes sense that we still write in that way nowadays.

Mike: We still play live instruments all the time. We both play a few different instruments. We have quite a few guitars. We collect instruments, and I've got a lot of percussion instruments for example. We record music like this a lot, though we just haven't released any of it on the scale that we are releasing the Boards of Canada tracks. But one day we will.

There is a common quality to most of your tracks : the decaying of the sound, like it is on the verge of falling apart

Mike: We just destroy the sound. Most people spend ages trying to polish the sound and improve it, but we use tapes and old gear and analogue synths to downgrade the sound and make it more damaged, to sound older.


You seem to champion a way of life outside of urban environments

Marcus: We've both spent most of our lives in the country, although we've both also had periods of our lives living in cities too. We get more ideas for our music and art when we're in the countryside. It's not easy to explain. We think it's because being in the city tends to make musicians influence each other, and fashions and so on get mingled. You can't avoid being homogenised in the city. But when you're away from it you can let your imagination run wild and you don't stop for a minute to worry about what other people are going to think of your work. The peace we get in the countryside is analogous to having space in your head to dream.


what about the ecological concerns that seem to be at the core of your records ?


Mike: It's not a huge deal to us, it's just one issue we're concerned about, amongst a lot of issues. We're conscious of world issues such as the environment, debt, terrorism, censorship, human rights, and so on, and we can be very outspoken about our political beliefs at times, but usually we try to avoid letting it into our music. Another reason for the inclusion of those tracks is just the aesthetic of them, I mean we believe in the statements, but we also want to include things like that just because they evoke a certain type of Governmental public-awareness broadcast. It adds to the idea that you're not actually listening to an album by one band, but in fact a collage of different recordings, a bit like tuning between stations on a shortwave radio.


Is there much pressure when working on a new record ?


Marcus: The only pressure on us when we're recording music is from ourselves. If you let the fans or the record company start to apply pressure on you, your music would suffer. So we just keep away from everyone and get on with jamming and writing, and after a while a record comes out of it. Mike: That's precisely one of the most important things about us as a band. We hate listening to perfect music, and one of the things we strive to do is to damage the sound in such a way that the listener can't tell what time-period the music comes from. We have a lot of techniques for this, such as obvious things like adding drop-outs, wobble, filtering, scratches, flutters, as well as a few secret recipes. The damaged sound adds a character that you can associate with an imaginary and distant time or place. It's like a barely controlled chaos, it's always on edge, threatening to fall apart, just like the best music of the past, before everyone started using computers to sanitise and sterilise music in a cold and clinical way.


You have been an inspiration to many musicians. Are you aware of your huge influence ?

Marcus: We're a bit clueless about this to be honest, especially as we just get on with things and we don't listen to a lot of current 'electronica'. If we've inspired anyone to make their own records then that's great.

Mike: Absolutely not. I mean it's gratifying to know that people are out there who are really into our music, and those people matter to us. But commercial success and being in magazines and so on is a bit of a stress really and we don't care for it. You can't look at music as a business or a competition at the same time as making music you genuinely love. And we will never make music that we don't genuinely love.


What inspires you ?


Mike: Everything! We listen to a lot of different things, and most of it isn't electronic. We read a lot and watch films and TV. We're like sponges, we soak up everything in and it gives us ideas. Right now I'm getting a lot of inspiration from music by Clouddead, Vaughan Williams, early Cocteau Twins, Joni Mitchell, James Taylor, 1970's reggae, Aspera, and books on Nikola Tesla and maths, and films like 'The Illustrated Man' and 'Dark Star'. Marcus: We had a lot more than that. The big problem was putting together a few tracks that suited each other as a sort of continuous soundtrack. It's just an instinctive approach.

What influences you mostly ?

Mike: It's actually very difficult for us to talk about our direct influences because we've been listening to an incredible mix of things since we were very young. It's actually easier for us to name areas of music that we DON'T have an interest in! As for Steve Reich and his peers, we love this kind of music but we discovered it quite late, after we were creating our own experiments for years. Our biggest difficulty as both writers of music and listeners of music is the process of 'distilling' our influences down and eliminating all the things we don't want to do.

Marcus: We're interested in these things but not practitioners. We see ourselves as observers, outside all this stuff, like the religion theme and so on. They're all just subjects we're interested in, that inspire music somehow. At the end of the day, we're just trying to make music.

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Dayvan Cowboy
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boc bros wrote:Is there much pressure when working on a new record ?

Marcus: The only pressure on us when we're recording music is from ourselves. If you let the fans or the record company start to apply pressure on you, your music would suffer. So we just keep away from everyone and get on with jamming and writing, and after a while a record comes out of it.


i think this is very important when we think of why they haven't released albums more frequently/updated boc.com. i agree that i'd like to know what's going on with them, but it IS their music...hopefully it has been "awhile"...

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Nova Scotia Robot
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Is a great interview.

I love trying to remember as far back as I can. The reason it's difficult to remember so far back is because we didn't understand the things we saw in the same way we understand them now. In other words, our brain has difficulty making a connection to something that we placed in an area of our minds under certain association according to our understanding at an early age, whereas we would associate that something in a different category now that we have a different understanding of it. (that is incredibly hard to word) It gets much more technical involving actively making links between associative categories, but its late, and I'm tired... And it's getting really off topic...

But I do have tricks to remembering early childhood memories, it's worked with a couple people. not everyone though, not everyone can grasp the concept. those that can, remember more.
Image

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Dayvan Cowboy
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747Music wrote:Is a great interview.

I love trying to remember as far back as I can. The reason it's difficult to remember so far back is because we didn't understand the things we saw in the same way we understand them now. In other words, our brain has difficulty making a connection to something that we placed in an area of our minds under certain association according to our understanding at an early age, whereas we would associate that something in a different category now that we have a different understanding of it. (that is incredibly hard to word) It gets much more technical involving actively making links between associative categories, but its late, and I'm tired... And it's getting really off topic...

But I do have tricks to remembering early childhood memories, it's worked with a couple people. not everyone though, not everyone can grasp the concept. those that can, remember more.


Interesting. Throughout the past couple of months my memory has become incredible. I think it is because my life has become to bland and uneventful, that I constantly think of better times. But one thing I notice is that often unrelated memories from many years ago will just pop into my head, at random. Does anyone else get this?



Oh and that interview was great! Seems like probably one of the best.
Black then White are all I see in my infancy...Red and Yellow then came to me, reachin' out to me, lets me see...

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Dayvan Cowboy
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Vordhosbn wrote:
747Music wrote:Is a great interview.

I love trying to remember as far back as I can. The reason it's difficult to remember so far back is because we didn't understand the things we saw in the same way we understand them now. In other words, our brain has difficulty making a connection to something that we placed in an area of our minds under certain association according to our understanding at an early age, whereas we would associate that something in a different category now that we have a different understanding of it. (that is incredibly hard to word) It gets much more technical involving actively making links between associative categories, but its late, and I'm tired... And it's getting really off topic...

But I do have tricks to remembering early childhood memories, it's worked with a couple people. not everyone though, not everyone can grasp the concept. those that can, remember more.


Interesting. Throughout the past couple of months my memory has become incredible. I think it is because my life has become to bland and uneventful, that I constantly think of better times. But one thing I notice is that often unrelated memories from many years ago will just pop into my head, at random. Does anyone else get this?


yes, very often. the same case with dreams...there are certain dreams i remember so vividly from the past. x

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Dayvan Cowboy
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http://blogs.lesinrocks.com/j-ghosn/ind ... -of-canada

For the sake of the couple of missing questions.
nice interview.

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Sherbet Head
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Fantasic. This really, for the first time I think, explains their attitude to fame and insulating themselves from outside attention.


btw For anyone who's been watching my posts for the last couple of years you'll know that I used to have a copy of an interview they did in The Face. Anyway I lost the magazine before I got round to typing it up. Unless anyone knows different, this interview hasn't been seen on the web yet so it's one worth tracking down. Anyway, I'm visiting somone this weekend who has a collection of that magazine so I should be able to get the transcription at last.

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Sherbet Head
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I have a 2006 interview from OOR here, which isn't on the boc pages. It's dutch tho and i really dont feel like translating (i also would'nt be able to do that very good i guess). Should i post it anyway?

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Sherbet Head
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Frank wrote:I have a 2006 interview from OOR here, which isn't on the boc pages. It's dutch tho and i really dont feel like translating (i also would'nt be able to do that very good i guess). Should i post it anyway?


I would. If it's up there, there's more chance that we will get a translation from someone else.

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Sherbet Head
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Aight. Boom!

by Koen Poolman - OOR - November 2005
Nog nooit spraken ze met een Nederlandse journalist. Ze spreken sowieso eigenlijk nooit. Optreden doen ze sinds hun entree in 1998 gemiddeld één keer per drie jaar. Hetzelfde tempo houden ze met hun albums aan. Ze wonen en werken teruggetrokken in de bossen van de Schotse Pentland Hills. Boards of Canada, het laatste geheim van de pop. Ze voegden weer een hoofdstuk aan hun mythe toe: The Campfire Headphase. Koen Poolman reisde af naar Schotland om zijn helden te ontmoeten.

Laten we bij het eind beginnen: De Radiohead-vraag. Zonder Boards of Canda’s Music Has The Right To Children (1998) had Kid A (2000) heel anders geklonken, luidt de mare. Mike en Marcus aarzelen. ‘Dat zou ik niet durven zeggen.’ ‘Dat is niet eerlijk ten opzichte van hen.’ ‘Alsof ze anders geen geweldige plaat hadden gemaakt.’ ‘Misschien hebben ze wel goed geluisterd naar Aphex Twin en Autechre.’ Nee, dat succes willen ze niet claimen. Dat Thom Yorke een bewonderaar is van hun warme, broeierige elektronica, is genoeg. Kid A en Amnesiac vinden ze mooie platen. U2 schijnt ook fan te zijn. Dat laat ze dan weer koud. De roem kan ze gestolen worden. Feit is dat Music Has The Right To Children en opvolger Geogaddi (2002) - beide met 200.000 verkochte cd’s na Aphex Twin en Nightmares on Wax de bestsellers in de experimentele Warp-catalogus - talloze bands en producers hebben geïnspireerd.

Het zijn van die platen die jarenlang meegaan en steeds beter worden. Ze logenstraffen het cliché van elektronische muziek als kille, cleane, mechanische, sciencefiction-achtige muziek voor de wereld van morgen. Hier is een groep die haar best doet haar geluid zo ouderwets, gammel, en zelfs ‘beschadigd’ mogelijk te maken, die zich liever haar onbezorgde jeugddroom herinnert dan droomt van een leven tussen robots, die gitaren, fluiten, windorgels, drums, percussie, analoge synthesizers en aftandse taperecorders verkiest boven de nieuwste software, die voortdurend in folky sferen lijkt te verkeren, die verplicht tot luisteren en die perfectie afzweert. Menselijke muziek is niet ongenaakbaar. Geen kloppende pulse, maar een brok in de keel. Een lichte hapering, een traan.
En dan: een huivering. Je hoort dingen die je eerst niet hoorde. Stemmen, boodschappen, hallucinaties. Wie in de caleidoscopische wereld van Boards of Canada duikt, ontdekt sporen van occultisme, religieuze cults, spionagenetten, numerologie, mathematische concepten... Ze zitten verstopt in titels, artwork, samples, de lengte van de tracks, het aantal tracks, in talloze achterwaarts afgespeelde stemmen, zelfs in de heuse audio palindromen: zinnetjes die voor- en achterwaarts afgespeeld identiek zijn. The Devil is In The Details heette een van de nummers van Geogaddi. De cd telde 23 tracks (een mystiek getal voor occultisten), duurde 66 minuten en 6 seconden en was 666 Mb groot. Bijrollen: Dave Koresh, leider van de Branch Davidians-sekte in Waco, en Pan, de ‘god with hooves’. heidense god der weiden en bossen. Eerst zie je ze niet, dan lijken ze opeens overal te zitten. De magie van Boards of Canada - opererend vanuit een afgelegen woongemeenschap in de bossen van de Schotse Pentland Hills, onder Edinburgh, waar ze hun eigen studio hebben - kreeg langzaam een zwart randje. En al die jaren weigerden ze naar buiten te treden. Ze deden slechts een handvol interviews over de e-mail en stonden, na hun stille entree met Music Has The Right To Children, drie keer op een podium.
Een Enigma.

Nu hebben ze dan eindelijk ingestemd met een face to face interview, Eén per land, twee uur lang. Ze hebben een hoop uit te leggen. Over hun nieuwe album The Campfire Headphase bijvoorbeeld, maar ook over de wilde verhalen die het mysterie Boards of Canada zijn gaan omgeven. Ze willen bewijzen dat ze ‘ordinary blokes’ zijn en geen ‘magiërs ie mensenoffers brengen op een bergtop.’ De mythe heeft een loopje met ze genomen, beseft Mike. ‘Als je zolang uit de media wegblijft gaan mensen vanzelf de gaten in je verhaal opvullen.’
Mike is Micheal Sandison, 34 jaar, vader van een dochtertje van één. Hij oogt vermoeid. Lijdt aan slapeloosheid en depressies. Draagt een zwarte trui, spijkerbroek en gympen. Baardje van een week. Onopvallend. Marcus Eion (32) is knapper, sportiever ook. Hij blijkt een verfent snowboarder. Getrimd baardje, het haar met gel in model gehouden. De ring om zijn vinger zegt dat hij vorig jaar getrouwd is. Op zijn T-shirt staan de namen van weirdo-rappers Boom Bip en Dose One. Mike is een vlotte prater. Marcus is iets bedachtzamer, geeft uitleg bij Mike’s verhaal.
Het grootste misverstand,’ gaat Mike verder waar hij begonnen is, ‘is onze humor. Veel mensen missen onze ironie. Ze nemen alles wat wij doen veel te letterlijk.’ Ze zijn, zegt hij bijna verontschuldigend, gewoon geïnteresseerd in oude culturen, religieuze uitspattingen, wetenschappelijke vraagstukken, alles wat afwijkt van de norm. Meer moeten we er niet achter zoeken. En nee, ze zijn beslist geen ‘failed techno band’, zoals ze wel eens lezen op internetfora van IDM-diehards. Ze hebben nooit intelligent dance music willen maken. ‘Eigenlijk zijn we nooit geïnteresseerd geweest in dancemuziek, techno of wat dan ook. Die wereld staat heel ver van onze af. Van kinds af aan hebben we ieder instrument opgepakt dat voor het grijpen lag en er een hoop herrie mee gemaakt. Wij zijn geen technokids.’

Enter: The Campfire Headphase. Weer zo’n ongepoetste juweel met intieme synths, beats en, voor het eerst, gitaarloops die, goed tegen het licht gehouden, langzaam begint te glinsteren. Met het licht reflecteert ook het beeld van een klassieke roadtrip door het oude Amerika, kriskras door de tijd. Titels als Dayvan Cowboy, 84 Pontiac Dream, en Ataronchronon (een oude indianenstam) verraden iets van de bedoeling. ‘De basis,’ legt Mike uit, ‘is een fantasie, een mind trip. Je zit ergens in een kamp in het bos, spaced out rond het kampvuur. Het is donker, je bent alleen, je sluit je ogen en je fantaseert over het Amerika van de achttiende eeuw. Je verliest je tijdsbesef. Uren worden dagen, weken. Er gebeuren vreemde dingen, onverklaarbare dingen, sprongen in de tijd, transformaties, een beetje surrealistisch, zonder dat je het als zodanig ervaart. Het is een droom, je bent écht die cowboy. Totdat de muziek ineens overgaat, zoals in 84 Pontiac Dream. Je ontwaakt, je hoort stemmen om je heen, de regen komt met bakken uit de hemel. Je zit ergens in Central Park, in de verte hoor je iemand op een akoestische gitaar spelen en je weet bij God niet hoe je hier gekomen bent.’ Marcus: ‘Complete chaos, een wereld zonder logica, dat idee. Ken je de film Zabriskie Point? Voor mij heeft deze plaat dezelfde sfeer. Het is een krankzinnige roadmovie. Er gebeurt van alles wat niet logisch is, je probeert er een lijn in te ontdekken, een verklaring te vinden, maar aan het eind van de film weet je nog steeds niet wat er nu eigenlijk gebeurd is.’ Mike: ’De centrale vraag is: hoeveel van deze ervaringen zijn echt? Hebben ze echt plaatsgevonden? Hoeveel voltrok zich in een hallucinatie? Wie wel eens een psychedelische ervaring heeft gehad, weet dat zoiets niet letterlijk na te vertellen is, het verandert ieder moment.’
Sherbet Head, zo’n miniatuurtje waarvan Boards of Canada er meer heeft, en vaak hele mooie, verwoordt de psychedelische ervaring misschien nog wel het beste: een hoofd vol sorbetijs. Daas, wauws. Een beetje duizelig. Lichte tinteling. Was die inktzwarte voorganger Geogaddi een bad trip, The Campfire Headphase is zijn tegenhanger: de good trip.

Geogaddi eindigde met Corsair, ‘het licht aan het einde van de tunnel’; aan het einde van de good trip wacht een downer. De laatste drie tracks gaan diep, héél diep. Marcus: ‘Daardoor blijft het langer hangen.’ Mike: ‘Ik zou nooit iets kunnen maken dat helemaal optimistisch is.’ Vooral het afsluitende Farewell Fire, een pastorale orgeldrone, grijpt naar de keel. Ze willen niet zeggen voor wie het geschreven is, maar het kan alleen maar een dierbare geweest zijn die is overleden.
Mike vertelt: ‘Farewell Fire is Marcus op keyboards, meer niet. Hij heeft het in één nachtelijke sessie gemaakt. Er zitten momenten in dat het hapert en het echt voelt als iemand die van verdriet niet meer in staat is om goed te spelen. Dat kun je met geprogrammeerde muziek nooit bereiken. Ook al is het een elektronisch stuk, het klinkt heel menselijk, hartverscheurend. Het moment dat het even stopt, is alsof er naar adem gehapt moet worden, als een stem die even zwijgt.’ Marcus: ‘Veel mensen die elektronische muziek maken gaan ervan uit dat die steriel en mechanisch moet zijn... en futuristisch [cynisch lachje]. Dat is heel eenvoudig, het enige wat je hoeft te doen is de apparatuur aan te zetten. De kunst is om die synthetische klanken een emotie mee te geven, alsof het een stem is.’ Een synthlijn, licht Mike toe, wordt geschreven alsof het een zanglijn is, een zanglijn die bijna vals is. ‘De beste zangers hebben een beperkte stem. Zo’n stem als van Bob Dylan, zo nasaal, bevend, nooit helemaal zuiver, is verre van compleet, maar zit barstensvol karakter. Als je een sessiezanger zou vragen een van zijn songs te zingen, dan zou het technisch perfect zijn, maar zielloos, zonder leven. Dat is precies wat wij onszelf steeds voorhouden: het mag niet perfect zijn. We stoppen er met opzet fouten en beschadigde geluiden in om de muziek te laten ademen.

Wie voor het eerst een plaat van Boards of Canada hoort, zal zich verbazen over het ‘zingende’ geluid op de achtergrond, alsof de opnameband niet helemaal strak liep. Dat is precies wat er aan de hand is. Het duo zweert bij het geluid van oude cassettebandjes die niet meer zo goed afspelen, waarvan het geluid af en toe wegvalt, of is afgevlakt, die te langzaam gaan, of juist net iets te snel. Het geeft de opname een magisch tintje, vinden ze. Het voert hen terug naar de tijd dat ze zelf nog bandjes draaiden, naar hun verloren jeugd. Debuut-LP Twoism (1995) klonk als een mispersing, alsof het gat niet precies in het midden zat. Slow This Bird Down, op de nieuwe cd, heeft dit ook. De ‘zingende gitaar’, Chromakey Dreamcoat is opgenomen op het strand met de verrotste taperecorder die Marcus kon vinden. Hij heeft ook een digitale. Gebruikt ie zelden. De melodie van Julie and Candy (op Geogaddi) werd opgenomen met een paar fluiten en vervolgens eindeloos heen en weer gestuurd tussen de ingebouwde microfoons van twee tapedecks totdat er niets meer dan een luide, mistige galm, een soort misthoorn, overbleef.
Veel, bijna alles, wat je op hun platen hoort, komt van een fluit, een gitaar, een piano, een percussie-instrument, een windorgel of een ander exotisch instrument, maar de geluiden worden dermate lang ‘behandeld’ dat ze zelden als dusdanig herkenbaar zijn. Het lijken allemaal synthesizer geluiden. Hoe langer je een geluid bewerkt, hoe synthetischer het klinkt, legt Marcus uit. Hun synthesizers zijn trouwens ook vintage: oude analoge modellen met knarsende en krakende geluiden.

Noem hun werkwijze nooit nostalgisch; Marcus heeft er een hekel aan. Retro, nog zo’n woord. Te gemakkelijk, vindt hij. ‘Wij refereren aan iets uit het verleden, iets tragisch of iets moois dat verloren is gegaan, we proberen dat terug te halen, maar daar stoppen we niet, we proberen het verder te brengen, ons voor te stellen wat ervan geworden zou zijn als het nog steeds zou bestaan. We kopiëren het verleden niet, we herschrijven het, we negeren de loop die de geschiedenis heeft genomen. We gaan terug naar een bepaald moment in de tijd en plaats en slaan dan een alternatieve weg in. We zeggen tegen elkaar: Make it 1978 and then take it somewhere. Hoe had de muziek van nu geklonken als we toen met z’n allen die andere weg waren ingeslagen? Een soort parallelle wereld.’ Alsof de nineties nooit hebben plaatsgevonden, zoiets. Waar zouden de wereld en de muziek zijn als we die tijd hadden overgeslagen? ‘
De nineties, voor de goede orde, staan met hun schreeuwerige MTV-cultuur, hun ongebreidelde hedonisme en alsmaar verdergaande globalisatie voor alles wat fout is volgens het teruggetrokken levende duo.
Ze geloven heilig in een ‘sideways culture’. Marcus: ‘De meeste mensen nemen de wereld zoals zij is, ze staan nooit stil bij de vraag hoe de wereld er had kunnen uitzien als we niet met z’n allen door een tunnel waren gegaan. Als je kijkt naar de huidige staat van de muziek en je beschouwt de wortels van die muziek, dan wordt die weg automatisch gezien als de enige die de muziek had kunnen afleggen. Niemand realiseert zich dat die aanname bepalend is voor wat ze doen. Ze volgen gewoon dat pad. Zie het als een gang. Iedereen staat middenin de gang, de uitgang lonkt. Ze beschouwen de situatie en wéten: we móeten aan het eind van de gang zien te komen. Wat wij proberen te doen is ons voor te stellen dat er naast die gang nóg een gang is en dat je die gang wellicht via een geheime doorgang kan bereiken.’

Mike toont zich een groot bewonderaar van Jeroen Bosch (1450-1516), de diepreligieuze schilder wiens werk stilistisch noch thematisch aansloot bij stromingen uit zijn tijd. In tegenstelling tot het serene werk van zijn tijdgenoten ging het fantastische werk van Bosch over angst, afschuw en rampspoed. ‘Zijn werk zat vol vreemde, spookachtige elementen.’ doceert hij, ‘elementen waarvoor geen verklaring was. Het waren fantasieën. Zijn werk was surrealistisch voordat het surrealisme was uitgevonden. Zijn verbeelding was de doorgang naar een andere wereld. Er zitten elementen in zijn werk die er niet zouden moeten zitten, inconsequenties, en juist die maken zijn werk zo sterk, zo aangrijpend.’ Hij trekt een parallel met Music Has The Right To Children, waarop naïeve kinderstemmetjes botsen met atonale geluiden, chroomkleurige beats en dissonante melodieën. ‘Die kinderstemmetjes brengen je van je stuk, ze horen niet thuis in zulke duistere muziek. Je weet niet waarom ze er zijn, ze zijn er gewoon. Ze suggereren onschuld, maar ook gevaar. Je wéét het gewoon niet. Maar het grijpt je wel aan.’
‘Als je schilderijen zou maken van wat er volgens ons op onze platen gebeurt,’ zegt Mike, en hij verontschuldigt zich bij voorbaat voor de pretentie die in deze uitspraak besloten ligt, ’dan zouden dat hele surrealistische werken worden. ‘Er zou niks van kloppen. En toch zou je het niet hoeven uitleggen.’
Marcus: ‘Als je het moet uitleggen, is het geen kunst meer.’

Tuig een plaat op met verborgen boodschappen over God en Satan en stervelingen geloven dat zij afgezant van een van beide zijn, en je eindigt met een altaar. Zo noemt Marcus het vorige album Geogaddi, een altaar. Hij zegt het lichtelijk smalend. Op internet circuleren de wildste theorieën en analyses over de inmiddels drie jaar oude plaat. Over David Koresh en zijn Branch Davidians, aan wie het nummer 1969 en de EP In A Beautiful Place Out In The Country zouden zijn gewijd (klopt). Over de adaptatie van de gulden snede en bijzondere cijferreeksen zoals de Fibonacci-reeks in notenschema’s en songstructuren (klopt). Over links naar het werk van Bertold Brecht (onzin). Over samples van uitzendingen van spionagediensten in de Koude Oorlog (klopt). Over satanisme (onzin). Over audio palindromen (‘de techniek staat voor niets’). Over de albumtitel, die zoiets als De Woeste Aarde zou betekenen (stilzijgen). Dat laaste laten ze graag open. Er moet nog wel iets te raden overblijven.
Al die ‘dingetjes’, zoals Mike ze noemt, plaatsen de instrumentale muziek in een context, ze brengen een lijn aan, een concept, zo je wilt. ‘Zolang je bij concept maar niet denkt aan een plaat over de regels van het schaakspel.’
Op Geogaddi waren die dingetjes ontsproten uit de donkerste krochten van hun ziel, op al hun andere platen kun je ze herleiden tot een verlangen naar hun jeugd – het Leitmotiv in dit verhaal.
De verloren jeugd, de tijd dat het leven nog simpel was en geluk heel gewoon, daar zoeken ze naar. Die warmte. Onschuld. Dat gevoel dat iedere adolescent langzaam kwijtraakt. ‘Als ik depressief ben, en ik heb een lange geschiedenis van depressies.’ Bekent Mike. ‘dan zoek ik altijd troost in mijn kinderjaren. Die weemoed is altijd aanwezig in onze muziek.’
Eén ding wil hij nog over Geogaddi kwijt: ‘Het was een project, it’s its own thing. Een claustrofobische trip door een wereld vol paranoia en duisternis. Veel mensen verwarren de plaat met de mens. Wij zijn geen doemdenkers.’
‘Vergeet niet, ‘ zegt hij even later, ‘dat we in de studio zaten toen 9/11 gebeurde. De laatste vijf maanden van Geogaddi vielen samen met de nasleep van 9/11. Het was een angstige tijd, het voelde alsof we terugkeerden naar de Koude Oorlog. Opeens bekroop me weer de angst die ik als kind al gevoeld had voor de atoombom. Ik denk dat iedereen van onze generatie dat gevoel wel kent. We ontkwamen er niet aan, het drukte ons gemoed. De toon werd steeds beklemmender. De sfeer, de samples, het heeft er allemaal mee te maken,’ ‘Bovendien,’ gaat hij verder, ‘ging ik zelf door een moeilijke periode. Het was een klotejaar.’

‘Nu, vier jaar later,’ neemt Marcus het over, ‘lijkt die dreiging van 9/11 permanent geworden. De wereld lijkt permanent veranderd, blijvend onveiliger. Meer chaos en duisternis en paranoia. Als je dat dag in dag uit ervaart, ga je je vanzelf afvragen hoe kunne we hieraan ontsnappen? Hoe kunnen we die realiteit vergeten?’ Mike: ‘In plaats van mee te gaan doen in de psychose kun je ook een uitvlucht zoken.’ Toeval of niet, in dezelfde periode luisterde hij graag naar de eerste plaat van positivo’s The Polyphonic Spree. ‘Ik dacht, ik wil ook weer iets hoopvols maken.’
En zo werd het idee voor The Campfire Headfase geboren: ze zouden teruggaan naar de tijd dat hun muziek nog simpel escapisme was. Terug naar Twoism, het debut met zijn gekke zingende geluid. ‘Twoism is waarschijnlijk de minst politieke plaat die we gemaakt hebben. Het is muziek om bij weg te dromen. Ook al is je leven klote en haat je je werk, als je de plaat opzet en je laat meevoeren door de melodieën, vergeet je al je ellende. Dat hebben we nu ook weer proberen te creëren: een luchtbel waarin je kunt opstijgen en wegzweven. Weg van alles. De nieuwe plaat heeft geen geheime agenda. Het enige wat hij zegt is: fuck all this stuff, zet het nieuws uit, zeg die klotebaan op maak dat je wegkomt uit de stad, neem de tijd om eens terug te denken aan gelukkiger tijden. Iedereen heeft wel een jaar in zijn hoofd, de beste zomer van je leven. Dat is ons doel: we bieden je een venster naar de beste zomer van je leven.’
Marcus: ’zie het als een hulpmiddel. Een tijdmachine. Een privé-tijdmachine. Onze muziek werkt niet in de openbare ruimte, zij spreekt tot één luisteraar tegelijk. Het is muziek om in je eentje naar te luisteren. Om in weg te kruipen. we bieden je een veilige haven.’
Mike: ‘A place to go.’
Dan realiseert Mike zich opeens iets: ‘nu ik er zo over nadenk, dat is iets wat wij als vanzelfsprekend beschouwen, zozeer zelfs dat we ons niet kunnen voorstellen dat er mensen zijn die iets anders zouden willen bereiken met hun muziek. Maar veel mensen die urban muziek maken, of dat nu r&b of iets anders is, die denken precies het tegenovergestelde. Ze zeggen bijna: Wat we ook doen, het moet van deze wereld zijn. Het moet hier en nu representeren, het mag niet te veel afwijken. Het moet geschikt zijn om in Gap gedraaid te worden. Muziek is voor mij een escape from Gap. Als ik een kledingwinkel binnenloop, denk ik al gauw: fucking hell, ik zou wel iemand iets kunnen aandoen, ik moet hier zo snel mogelijk weer weg, terug naar mijn fantasiewereld.’

Terug naar de bossen van de Pentland Hills. Terug naar zijn vriendin en zijn dochtertje. En terug naar zijn broer. Want na enig aandringen willen ze het wel toegeven: Mike Sandison en Marcus Eion zijn broers. Eion – spreek uit: Ian – is Marcus’ tweede voornaam. Ze hebben het tien jaar lang geheim gehouden. Het doet er niet toe, vinden ze. Het verhaal is de muziek, niet de mensen. De mythe vervaagt, de muziek blijft.
Niemand kent ze, niemand heeft ze ooit zien optreden, niemand heeft ooit een advertentie of een videoclip of een tv-optreden van ze gezien (die bestaan niet), niemand weet wat ze precies denken, maar 200.000 eenzame zielen herkennen hun stille verdriet. Hun verlangen baarde de mooiste muziek van de laatse tien jaar. Vraag het maar aan Thom Yorke.

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To some extent, we believe that getting well known for your music is a toxic thing for the band. People start to feel that they own you and your music, and they get very particular about what they want you to do. It can become claustrophobic.


Lately this kind of attitude is so very blatant on these boards.

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Frank wrote:I have a 2006 interview from OOR here, which isn't on the boc pages. It's dutch tho and i really dont feel like translating (i also would'nt be able to do that very good i guess). Should i post it anyway?
not quite on the boc pages, but scans have been available on my server for a long time ;)

http://fredd-e.narfum.org/tmp/boc/oor/

also the one on Humo: http://fredd-e.narfum.org/tmp/boc/humo/

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Fredd-E wrote:
Frank wrote:I have a 2006 interview from OOR here, which isn't on the boc pages. It's dutch tho and i really dont feel like translating (i also would'nt be able to do that very good i guess). Should i post it anyway?
not quite on the boc pages, but scans have been available on my server for a long time ;)



But, but, but... mine is copypastable. :( 8)

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bleak. wrote:
Vordhosbn wrote:
747Music wrote:Is a great interview.

I love trying to remember as far back as I can. The reason it's difficult to remember so far back is because we didn't understand the things we saw in the same way we understand them now. In other words, our brain has difficulty making a connection to something that we placed in an area of our minds under certain association according to our understanding at an early age, whereas we would associate that something in a different category now that we have a different understanding of it. (that is incredibly hard to word) It gets much more technical involving actively making links between associative categories, but its late, and I'm tired... And it's getting really off topic...

But I do have tricks to remembering early childhood memories, it's worked with a couple people. not everyone though, not everyone can grasp the concept. those that can, remember more.


Interesting. Throughout the past couple of months my memory has become incredible. I think it is because my life has become to bland and uneventful, that I constantly think of better times. But one thing I notice is that often unrelated memories from many years ago will just pop into my head, at random. Does anyone else get this?


yes, very often. the same case with dreams...there are certain dreams i remember so vividly from the past. x


Every once and a while, out of the blue, I zone out and relive a thrity second clip from my early childhood. Whether it be a dream i had at an early age and had forgotten, or a memory I had forgotten. It's the most wonderful thing! Everything seems like the sun is low in the sky and the saturation of reds and oranges and beiges are high on everything. Every so often I can do this on command and it's great. Listening to music like boards or freescha or casino versus japan, helps.

So ya that happens to me too
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Frank wrote:
Fredd-E wrote:
Frank wrote:I have a 2006 interview from OOR here, which isn't on the boc pages. It's dutch tho and i really dont feel like translating (i also would'nt be able to do that very good i guess). Should i post it anyway?
not quite on the boc pages, but scans have been available on my server for a long time ;)



But, but, but... mine is copypastable. :( 8)

Images are copy pastable as well! :)

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Yet they spoke never with a Dutch journalist. They do never speak in any case actual. Action do they since their entrance in 1998 average one time per three year. The same tempo arrest they with their albums. They live and work withdrawn in the woods of the Scottish Pentland Hills. Boards or Canada, the last secret of the doll. They added again a chapter at their myth: The Campfire Headphase. Cows Poolman traveled finished to Scotland its heroes to meet.

We have begun by the end: The Radiohead-question. Without Boards or Canda’s Music Has The Right To Children (1998), Kid A (2000) had sounded quite otherwise, rings the word. Loaf and Marcus hesitate. 'That will I dare not say.' 'That is not honestly to respect of them.' 'As if they otherwise no tremendous plate had made.' 'Perhaps have they well good listened to Aphex Twin and Autechre.' No, that success do not want to claim they. That Thom York an admirer is is enough of theirs 's warm, sultry electronics. Kid A and Amnesiac find they beautiful flat. U2 appears to be also fan. That let she then again hardly. The fame can be stolen they. Fact is that Music Has The Right To Children and inspired successor Geogaddi (2002) - both with 200,000 sold cd’s after Aphex Twin and Nightmares on Wax the bestsellers in the experimental Threw-catalog - talloze ties and producers.

It being of that flats that accompany for years on end and become always better. They belie the cliché of electronic music as chilly, cleane, mechanical, sciencefiction-achtige music for the world from tomorrow. Here is a group that her best does her sound so old-fashioned, rickety, and even 'damaged' possible to make, that self rather her carefree youth dream reminds then dreams of a life between robots, that guitars, whistle, wind organs, drums, percussie, analogous synthesizers and aftandse taperecorders chooses above the newest software, that continuing in folky atmospheres appears be wrong, that commit to listen and that perfection renounces. Human music is not unapproachablely. No knocking pulse, but a piece in the throat. A light hesitation, a tear.

And then: a vibration. You hear things that you heard not firstly. Votes, errands, hallucinations. He who dives in the caleidoscopische world of Boards or Canada, discovers tracks of occultisme, religious cults, espionage net, numerologie, mathematical drafts... They sit conceals in titles, artwork, samples, the length of the tracks, the number tracks, in talloze backward worn-out votes, even in the real audio palindromen: zinnetjes that furrow and backward played identical be. The Devil is was named In The Details one of the numbers of Geogaddi. The cd bred 23 tracks (a mystical number for occult food), lasted 66 minutes and 6 seconds and was 666 Mb large. Bijrollen: Dave Koresh, leader of the Branch Davidians-sect in Waco, and Pan, the 'god with hooves'. pagan god of the meadows and woods. Firstly you do not see appear she, then to sit they suddenly everywhere. The magic of Boards or Canada - operating from a remote commune in the woods of the Scottish Pentland Hills, under Edinburgh, where they their own studio have - got slowly a black edge. And all that years they refused to step to outside. They did only a handful of interviews over the e-mail and stood, after their quiet entrance with Music Has The Right To Children, three turn on a stage. An Enigma.

Now they agreed interview then finally with a face to face, Eén per country, two hour long. They have to lay a hope out. Over their new album The Campfire Headphase for instance, but also over the want to tell that the mysteries Boards or Canada are will surround. They want to prove that they 'ordinary cram' are and no 'wizards he men offering bring on a summit.' The myth has taken a run with they, realized Loaf. 'As you meanwhile from the media stays away go men by itself the holes in your story fill up.'

Loaf is Micheal Sandison, 34 year, father of a daughter of one. He oogt vermoeid. Suffers at insomnia and depressions. A black sweater, jeans carries and gympen. Beard of a week. Inconspicuous. Marcus Eion (32) is knapper, more sportingly also. He appeared a verfent snowboarder. Worked out beards, the hair with gel in model held. The ring round its finger says that he last year gotten married is. On its T-SHIRT stand the names of weirdo-rappers Tree Bip and Box On. Loaf is a fleets prouder. Marcus is somewhat more cautious, gives explanation by Mike’s tell.

The largest misunderstanding,' goes Loaf further where he begun is, is our humor '. Many men miss our irony. They take everything we do much too literally.' They are, says excused he almost, interested normally in old cultures, religious excesses, scientific problems, everything deviates from the standard. More we must not seek behind it. And no, they have been decided no 'failed techno tie', as they read once in a while on internet forums of IDM-diehards. They have never want to make intelligent dance music. 'Actual we have never been interested been in dancemuziek, techno or whatever. That world gives up quite far of our. Of children off on have we every instrument picked up that for the grabbing lay and it a hope noise with made. We are no technokids.'

Yearling: The Campfire Headphase. Again so ongepoetste jewel with intimate synths, stained and begins, for the first time, guitar course, that, goods held against the light, slowly to sparkle. With the light also the image of a classic roadtrip reflects through the old America, kriskras through the time. Titles as a Dayvan Cowboy, 84 Pontiac Dream, and Ataronchronon (an old indias stem) betray something of the intention. 'The basis,' explains Loaf, 'is a phantasy, trip a mind. You sit somewhere in a camp in the woods, spaced out around the campfire. It is dark, are alone you, close you your eyes and you fantasize over the America of the eighteenth century. You lose your times understanding. Hours become summon, weeks. It happen strange things, inexplicable things, leaps in the time, transformations, a little bit surreal, without that you it as such experience. It is a dream, you are écht that cowboy. Until the music goes over all at once, as in 84 Pontiac Dream. You awake, hear come you votes round you off, the rain with bins from the heaven.

You sit somewhere in Central Park, in the distance hear you someone on an acoustic guitar play and your knowledge with God not how you here come are.' Marcus: 'Complete chaos, a world without logic, that idea. Do you know the film Zabriskie Point? For me, this plate has the same atmosphere. It is a mad roadmovie. There lifted of everything not logically is, you try there a line in to discover, an explanation to find, but at the end of the film know you still not what it now actual happened is.' Is loaf:' De central question: how much are marriage of these experiences? Have they marriage taken place? Did how many take place in a hallucination? Who once in a while a psychedelische experience have had, know them to me that zoiets not literally after telling itself to them is itself to them, it changes itself to them every moment.'

Sherbet Head, as miniature, of which Boards or Canada has it more, and often whole beautiful, formulates the psychedelische experience perhaps yet well the best: a head full sorbetijs. Daas, wauws. A little bit dizzily. Light tinteling. Was that ink black predecessor Geogaddi trip a bath, The Campfire Headphase is its counterpart: the good trip.

Geogaddi ended with Corsair, 'the light at the end of the tunnel'; at the end of the good, watch trip a more down. The last three tracks go deep, héél deeply. Marcus: 'Through that remains the longer hang.' Loaf: 'I will never something can make that totally optimistically is.' Especially the closing Farewell Fire, a pastoral orgeldrone, reaches for the throat. They do not want to say for who the written is, but it can only a dear been its that is passed away. Loaf tells: 'Farewell Fire is not Marcus on keyboards, more. He has made the in one nocturnal session. It sit moments in that it sticks and the marriage feels as someone that of sorrow no longer in state good is to be played. That can never reach you with programmed music. In such a way one is sounds electronic piece, it quite human, heartrendingly. The moment that it just stops, is as if it to breath bitten must become, if a voice that just is silent.' Marcus: 'Many men that electronic musics make go of it from that that sterile and mechanically must be... and futuristic [cynical laugh]. That is quite simple, needs is it some what you to do the equipment on to set. The art is that synthetic sounds an emotion with to give, as if is one voice.' A synthlijn, light Loaf to, is written as if is one song line, a song line that is almost false. 'Best singers a limited have vote. As voice as of Bob Dylan, as nasal, trembling, totally pure, is never far from complete, but stretch barstensvol character. If you a session singer would ask to sing one of its songs, then will it technically perfectly be, but soulless, without life. That is precise present what we ourselves always: it may not be perfect. We stop to let breathe there on purpose mistake and damaged sounds in the music.

He who for the first time a plate of Boards hears or Canada, will not amaze walked self over the 'singing' sound on the background, as if the recording tie totally tightly. That is precise is what there at the hand. The duo swears by the sound of old cassette ties that no longer so good play, of which the sound finished and closed is omitted, or is afgevlakt, that too slow go, or just neat something too fast. It gives the recording a magic touch, find she. It leads them back to the time that they self yet ties turned, notwithstanding that their lost youth. Debut-LP Twoism (1995) sounded not as a mispersing, as if the hole precisely in the middle drunkenly. Slow This Bird Down, on the new cd, has this also. The 'singing guitar', Chromakey Dreamcoat has been taken up on the beach with the verrotste taperecorder that Marcus wanted to find. He has also a digital. He uses rarely. The melody of Julie and Candy (on Geogaddi) was taken up with a few whistle and then infinitely away and again steered between the built in microphones of two tapedecks until there nothing more than a loud, foggy sound, a kind of mist horn, was left. Many, almost everything, what you on their flat hear, come from a flute, a guitar, a piano, a percussie-instrument, a wind organ or someone else exotic instrument, but the sounds become so long 'treated' that they rarely as such recognizably are. The appearing all synthesizer sounds. How long you a sound works, lays how more synthetically it sounds, Marcus out. Their synthesizers its besides also vintage: old analogous models with crunching and creaky sound. Loaf tells: 'Farewell Fire is not Marcus on keyboards, more. He has made the in one nocturnal session. It sit moments in that it sticks and the marriage feels as someone that of sorrow no longer in state good is to be played. That can never reach you with programmed music. In such a way one is sounds electronic piece, it quite human, heartrendingly. The moment that it just stops, is as if it to breath bitten must become, if a voice that just is silent.' Marcus: 'Many men that electronic musics make go of it from that that sterile and mechanically must be... and futuristic [cynical laugh]. That is quite simple, needs is it some what you to do the equipment on to set. The art is that synthetic sounds an emotion with to give, as if is one voice.' A synthlijn, light Loaf to, is written as if is one song line, a song line that is almost false. 'Best singers a limited have vote. As voice as of Bob Dylan, as nasal, trembling, totally pure, is never far from complete, but stretch barstensvol character. If you a session singer would ask to sing one of its songs, then will it technically perfectly be, but soulless, without life. That is precise present what we ourselves always: it may not be perfect. We stop to let breathe there on purpose mistake and damaged sounds in the music.

Their method do never name nostaglicly; Marcus has there a hackle on. Retro, yet so word. Too easy, he finds. 'We refer to something from the past, something tragic or something well that lost is gone, we try that back to get, but there stoppers we not, we try it further to bring, us for to put what of it become would be as it still would exist. We do not copy rewrite ignore it lately, we it, we the course that the histories taken has. We go back to a particular moment in the time and place and hit then an alternative away in. We say against each other: Make it 1978 and then task it somewhere. How had the music sounded be had been smashed of now as we with all that others away then? A kind of parallel world.' As if the nineties took never place, zoiets. Where will the world and the music its as we that time had missed? 'The nineties, before the good orders, stand with their schreeuwerige MTV-culture, their unbridled hedonisme and constantly verdergaande globalisatie for everything wrong is according to the withdrawn living duo. Many, almost everything, what you on their flat hear, come from a flute, a guitar, a piano, a percussie-instrument, a wind organ or someone else exotic instrument, but the sounds become so long 'treated' that they rarely as such recognizably are. The appearing all synthesizer sounds. How long you a sound works, lays how more synthetically it sounds, Marcus out. Their synthesizers its besides also vintage: old analogous models with crunching and creaky sound. Loaf tells: 'Farewell Fire is not Marcus on keyboards, more. He has made the in one nocturnal session. It sit moments in that it sticks and the marriage feels as someone that of sorrow no longer in state good is to be played. That can never reach you with programmed music. In such a way one is sounds electronic piece, it quite human, heartrendingly. The moment that it just stops, is as if it to breath bitten must become, if a voice that just is silent.' Marcus: 'Many men that electronic musics make go of it from that that sterile and mechanically must be... and futuristic [cynical laugh]. That is quite simple, needs is it some what you to do the equipment on to set. The art is that synthetic sounds an emotion with to give, as if is one voice.' A synthlijn, light Loaf to, is written as if is one song line, a song line that is almost false.

They believe hallow in a 'sideways culture'. Marcus: 'Most men take the world as she is, they stand never quiet by the question how the worlds there wanted to can look forward as we not with be all through a tunnel were gone. If you look at the present state of the music and you consider the roots of that music, then becomes that away automatically seen as the only that the music wanted to can take off. Nobody realizes that that aanname modifying is for what they do. They follow normally that path. See it as a course. Everybody stands ogles in the Middle the course, the exit. They consider the situation and wéten: we móeten at the end of the course see to come. What we try to do is us for to let us assume that there next to that course nóg a course is and that you that course possibly via a secret passage can reach.'

Loaf shows self a large admirer of Jeroen Bosch (1450-1516), the deep religious painter whose work stylisticly neither thematicly connected by currents out its time. In contrast till the serene work of its contemporaries went the fantastic work of Bosch over fear, horror and disaster hurry. 'Its work sat fully strange, ghostly elements.' lectures he, 'elements for which no explanation was. It were phantasies. Its work was had been invented surreally before the surrealisme. Its imagination was the passage to someone else world. It sit in elements its work that it do not ought to sit inconsequenties, and just that its work make so strong, as moving.' He pulls collide stained a parallel with Music Has The Right To Children, on which naïve kinderstemmetjes with atonale sounds, chroomkleurige and dissonante melodies. 'That kinderstemmetjes you of you do not bring hear to pieces, they home in such dark music. You know not about which they there are, they are there usual. They suggest innocence, but also danger. Your wéét it normally not. But it grab you well at.' 'As your paintings would make of what there according to us on our flat lifted,' says Loaf, and he apologizes in advance for the pretension that in this pronunciation decided lies,' then will that whole surreal works become. 'There nothing would knock from. And really you would not need explain it.' Marcus: 'As you it must explain, is it no art more.'

Harness a plate on with hidden errands over God and Devil and mortals believe that they envoy of an of both are, and you end with an altar. As Marcus the previous album Geogaddi, an altar names. He says the lightly scornful. On internet, the wildest theories circulate and analyses over the meanwhile three years old plate. Over David Koresh and its Branch Davidians, at who the number 1969 and the EP In A Beautiful Place Out In The Country would be dedicated (knocks). Over the adaptatie of the golden incision and particular figure series as the Fibonacci-series in notenschema’s and songstructuren (knocks). Over left to the work of Bertold Brecht (nonsense). Over samples of broadcasts of espionage services in the Cold War (knocks). Over satanisme (nonsense). Over audio palindromen ('the technique stands for nothing'). Over the album title, that zoiets mean (stilzijgen) will as a De Fierce Earth. That laaste leave open they gladly. There yet well something to guess must be left. All that 'things', as Loaf names she, place the instrumentale music in a context, they bring a line on, a draft, as you want. 'Meanwhile you by draft only do not thinks of a plate over the rules of the chess game.'

On Geogaddi were that things sprouted from the darkest krochten of their soul, on all their others flat can you they reduce till a long for their youth – the Leitmotiv in this tell. The lost youth, the time that the life yet simply was and luck quite usual, to that seek they. That heat. Innocence. That feel that every adolescent slowly loses. 'As I depressed am, and I have a long history of depressions.' Confesses Loaf. 'Then I seek always comfort in my childhood. That melancholy is always present in our music.' Eén compete want discharge he yet over Geogaddi: 'It was a project, it’s its own thing. A claustrofobische trip through a world full paranoia and darkness. Many men confuse the plate with the man. We are no doom thinkers.' 'Forgets not, 'says he just later on, 'that we in the studio sat then 9/11 happened. The last five months of Geogaddi fell together with the aftermath of 9/11. It was an anxious time, felt it as if returned we to the Cold War. Suddenly me came over prevent the fear that I had felt as a child already for the nuclear bomb. I think that everybody of our generation that feeling well knows. We escaped there not, the bustle our mind. The tone became town beklemmender. The atmosphere, the samples, it has to make there all with,' 'Moreover,' goes he further, 'went I self through a difficult period. It was a klotejaar.'

'Now, four years later,' takes Marcus the over, 'appears that threats of 9/11 permanent become. The world appears changed permanent, Remaining more unsafely. More chaos and darkness and paranoia. If you that day in day out experience, go you yourself by itself wonder how can we at this escape? How can we forget that reality?' Loaf: 'Instead of with to go do in the psychosis can you also an excuse zoken.' Coincidence or, in the same period he listened not gladly to the first plate of positivo’s The Polyphonic Spree. 'I thought, I want also again something hopeful make.' And so became the idea for The Campfire Headfase born: they would go back to the time that their music yet simple escapisme was. Back to Twoism, the debut with are mad singing sound. 'Twoism is probable the slightest political plate that we made have. It is music by away to dream. In such a way you are live bastard and hate you you work, forgets if you carry along let the plate intention and you through the melodies, you already your misery. That have try we now also again to create: an air bubble in which you ascend can and wegzweven. Way of everything. The new plate has no secret agenda. The some what he says is: fuck all this dope, set it news out, say that klotebaan on make that you get away from the city, take the time once back to think of happier times. Everybody has live well a year in its head, the best summer of you. That is our target: we offer live you a window to the best summer of you.'

Marcus:' it see as an aid. A time machine. A private-time machine. Our music works not in the public space, she speaks until one listener at the same time. It is music in you a to to listen. In way. we you offer to crawl a safe harbor.' Loaf: 'A place to go.' Then Loaf realizes suddenly something: 'Now I about it so think, that is something we as self-evident consider, so much even that we us cannot propose that it men its that something else would want reach with their music. Only many men that urban musics make whether now r&b is or something else, that think precise the tegenovergestelde. They say almost: What we also do, must be it of this world. It must here and now represent, it may not deviate too much. It must have been arranged Gape turned round in to become. Music is Gape for me an escape from. If I go in a clothing store, I think already quickly: fucking slope, would be able to put on I well someone something, I must here so fast possible away, back again to my phantasy world.'

Back to the woods of the Pentland Hills. Back to its friend and its daughter. And back to its brother. For after simply they want to insist admit it well: Loaf Sandison and Marcus Eion are brothers. Eion – pronounce: Ian – is Marcus' second first name. They held the ten years long secret. It adds there not, find she. The story is not the music, the men. The myth blurs, remains the music. Nobody knows has see act she, nobody they ever, nobody has not act seen know precisely think ever an advertisement or a videoclip or a Tv-of they (that existence), nobody what they, but 200,000 solitary souls recognize their quiet sorrow. Their desire beard the most beautiful music of the laatse ten year. Ask the but at Thom York.

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Dayvan Cowboy
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Babelfish FTW!

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Eagle Minded
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F***ing review!!!

thx to John Fonda
Telephasic Workshop

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Sherbet Head
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Omg lol!

"Loaf and Marcus" nearly killed me. :lol:

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ryetronics wrote:Babelfish FTW!
I think google's better at translating:
http://google.com/translate They use their search engine to find matching translations on the internet for the actual phrases.

Never spoke with a Dutch journalist. They never speak anyway. Action done since their admission in 1998 on average once every three years. The same keep pace with their albums. They live and work in the woods withdrawn from the Scottish Pentland Hills. Boards of Canada, the last secret of the dummy. They added another chapter to their myth: The Campfire Headphase. Koen Poolman traveled off to Scotland for his heroes to meet.

Let us begin at the end: The Radiohead question. Without Boards of Canda's Music Has The Right To Children (1998) had Kid A (2000) very different riveted, is the mare. Mike and Marcus hesitate. 'That I would not dare say. "That's not fair towards them."' As if they otherwise had made no great plate. " 'Maybe they have to listen to Aphex Twin and Autechre." No, you want success they do not claim them. That Thom Yorke is an admirer of their warm, broeierige electronics, is enough. Kid A and Amnesiac find them beautiful plates. U2 fan seems to be. That leaves them cold weather. The fame they can be stolen. The fact is that Music Has The Right To Children and successor Geogaddi (2002) - both with 200,000 CDs sold after Aphex Twin and Nightmares on Wax on the bestseller in the experimental Warp catalog - countless bands and producers have inspired.

It is of such plaques along for years and continue to improve. They logenstraffen the cliché of electronic music as cold, clean, mechanical, science fiction-like music for the world of tomorrow. Here is a group that is doing its best so their sound old-fashioned, gammel, and even 'damaged' as possible, which is rather than recalls her carefree childhood dreams of a life between robots, guitars, flutes, windorgels, drums, percussion, analog synthesizers and aftandse taperecorders over the latest software, which is constantly folky atmospheres appears to state, which obliged to listen and which renounces perfection. Human music is not ongenaakbaar. No pulse beating, but a lump in the throat. A slight hapering, a tear.
And then: a huivering. You hear things you did not hear. Votes, messages, hallucinations. Who in the world caleidoscopische of Boards of Canada appears, discovered traces of occultism, religious cults, spionagenetten, numerology, mathematical concepts ... They are hidden in titles, artwork, samples, the length of the tracks, the number of tracks, in many voices played backwards, even in the real audio palindromen: phrases that front and rear played identical. The Devil's In The Details called one of the numbers of Geogaddi. The CD had 23 tracks (a mystical number in occultisten), lasted 66 minutes and 6 seconds and was 666 Mb in size. Bijrollen: Dave Koresh, leader of the Waco Siege-sect in Waco, and Pan, the god with hooves. " Pagan god of the pastures and forests. First you see they do not, then they suddenly seem to be everywhere. The magic of Boards of Canada - operating from a household in the remote forests of the Scottish Pentland Hills, Edinburgh, where they have their own studio - slowly got a black edge. And all these years they refused to take action outside. They did only a handful of interviews about the e-mail and were, after their silent entree with Music Has The Right To Children, three times a podium.
An Enigma.

Now they have finally agreed to a face to face interview, one per country, two hours long. They have a lot to explain. About their new album The Campfire Headphase for instance, but also about the wild stories that the mystery Boards of Canada have become surrounded. They want to prove that they are "ordinary blokes' and not 'ie human magicians bring in a mountain." Myth has taken a walk with them, Mike realizes. 'As long as you stay away from the media people are saying the holes in your story fill. "
Mike is Michael Sandison, 34 years, father of a daughter of one. He looks tired. Lijdt to insomnia and depression. Does a black sweater, jeans and gympen. Baardje a week. Onopvallend. Marcus Eion (32) is knapper, sportiever. He shows a verfent snowboarder. Getrimd baardje, with the hair gel in model. The ring around his finger says he married last year. On his T-shirt are the names of sustainable design-rappers Boom Bip and Dose One. Mike is a smooth prater. Marcus is something bedachtzamer, explains Mike's story.
The biggest misunderstanding, 'Mike goes further where he started,' is our humor. Many people miss the irony. They take everything we do far too literally. "They are, he says almost verontschuldigend simply interested in ancient cultures, religious extravagances, scientific issues, everything that deviates from the norm. Further, we must not support searching. And no, they are certainly not 'failed techno band', as they are sometimes found on Internet of IDM diehards. They never want to make intelligent dance music. 'Actually, we never been interested in dance music, techno or whatever. That world is very far from our. From childhood on, we have every instrument that picked up for grabs and there was a lot of noise it made. We are not technokids. "

Enter: The Campfire Headphase. There's another gem ongepoetste intimate with synths, beats and, for the first time, gitaarloops, good against the light, slowly begins to glinsteren. With the light also reflects the image of a classic roadtrip through the old America, crisscross through time. Titles like Dayvan Cowboy, 84 Pontiac Dream, and Ataronchronon (an old indian) betray something of the intention. "The basis," explains Mike, "is a fantasy, a mind trip. You are sitting somewhere in a camp in the forest, spaced out around the campfire. It is dark, you are alone, you close your eyes and you fantaseert on the Americas of the eighteenth century. You lose your of time. Hours, days, weeks. There strange things happen, inexplicable things, jumps in time, transformations, a bit surreal, without your experience as such. It is a dream, you are really that cowboy. Until the music suddenly passes, as in 84 Pontiac Dream. You wake up, you hear voices around you, the rain comes with containers from the sky. You are sitting somewhere in Central Park, in the distance you hear someone on an acoustic guitar playing and you know when God is not how come you are here. "Marcus:" Complete chaos, a world without logic, that idea. Do you know the film Zabriskie Point? For me this record has the same atmosphere. It is a crazy road. There is no sense of everything, there is a line you try to discover an explanation can be found, but at the end of the film you still do not know what actually happened. "Mike:" The central question is : how many of these experiences are real? Did they really occurred? What took place in a hallucination? Who ever has had a psychedelic experience, knows that something literally not to tell, it is changing every moment. "
Sherbet Head, a thumbnail which Boards of Canada more, and often very beautiful, expresses the psychedelic experience might have been the best: a head full of sorbetijs. Daas, wauws. A little dizzy. Light tingling. Was that inktzwarte predecessor Geogaddi a bad trip, The Campfire Headphase is his counterpart: the good trip.

Geogaddi ended with Corsair, "the light at the end of the tunnel '; at the end of the good trip awaits a downer. The last three tracks are deep, very deep. Marcus: "This continues to hang longer." Mike: "I would never be able to make something that is totally optimistic." Especially the closing Farewell Fire, a pastoral orgeldrone, goes to the throat. They do not want to say for whom it was written, but it can only have been a treasured who is deceased.
Mike says: 'Farewell Fire Marcus is on keyboards, nothing more. He has it in a night session. There are moments in that it stutters and it really feels like someone of sadness no longer able to play well. That is where you should never programmed music. Even if it is an electronic piece, it sounds very human, heartbreaking. The moment that you stop, as if to breath gehapt should be, as even a voice that is silent. "Marcus:" Many people who make electronic music assume that they must be sterile and mechanical ... And futuristic [cynical smile]. That is very simple, all you have to do is to set up the equipment. The trick is to get those synthetic sounds an emotion telling, as if it were a voice. "An synthlijn, explained Mike, is written as if it were a vocal line, a vocal that almost false. "The best singers have a limited voice. Such a vote as Bob Dylan, as nasal, shaky, never quite pure, is far from complete, but is crammed with character. If you have a sessiezanger would ask one of his songs to sing, it would be technically perfect, but zielloos without life. That is exactly what we ourselves always frontiers: it may not be perfect. We put there deliberately mistakes and damaged sounds in order to let the music breathe.

Who, for the first time a plate of Boards of Canada belongs, will be surprised on the 'singing' sound in the background, as if not quite tight opnameband walked. That is exactly what is happening. The duo swear by the sound of old tapes which are no longer playing so well, the sound of which occasionally fails, or is off, too slow, or just too fast. It gives the recording a magic touch, they found. It carries them back to the days when they still tapes turned to their lost youth. Debut Twoism-LP (1995) sounded like a mispersing, as if the hole is not exactly in the middle Saturday. Slow This Bird Down, on the new CD, this too. The 'singing guitar', Chromakey Dreamcoat is listed at the beach with the verrotste tape that Marcus could find. He also has a digital. Used rarely IE. The melody of Julie and Candy (Geogaddi) was recorded with a couple of flutes and then endlessly sent back and forth between the two microphones built tapedecks until nothing more than a loud, misty reverb, a sort misthoorn, remained.
Many, almost everything on their plates what you hear comes from a flute, a guitar, a piano, a percussion instrument, a windorgel or other exotic instrument, but the sounds are so long 'treated' as such that they rarely recognizable. It all seem synthesizer sounds. The longer you have a sound editing, synthetischer how it sounds, explains Marcus. Their synthesizers are also vintage: old analog models with knarsende and cracking sounds.

Call their practice never nostalgic; Marcus hates it. Retro, another word. Too easy, he finds. "We refer to something from the past, something tragic or something good that has been lost, we try to get it back, but we should not stop there, we try to bring us to imagine what it would become if it would still exist. We are not copying the past, we rewrite it, we ignore the history that the course has taken. We go back to a certain moment in time and place and store than an alternative road. We say to each other: Make it 1978 and then take it somewhere. How had the music of today as we were riveted with its all those other means had been imposed? A kind of parallel world. "As if the nineties never took place, something like that. Where would the world and the music if we had skipped that time? '
The nineties, for the sake of good order, with their screaming MTV culture, their unbridled hedonisme further globalization and increasingly for everything that is wrong according to the reclusive live duo.
They believe sacred in a 'sideways culture. " Marcus: "Most people take the world as it is, they are never look at how the world we could have if we do not look with its all went through a tunnel. If you look at the current state of music and you sees the roots of that music, that road will be automatically seen as the only one who could make music. Nobody realizes that this assumption is a determinant of what they do. They just follow that path. Think of it as a gang. Everybody is middle of the gang, the exit beckons. They consider the situation and know we móeten at the end of the corridor to see. What we try to do is for us to say that in addition to those launched another gang, and that you probably gang through a secret passage to reach. "

Mike proves himself a great admirer of Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), painter whose work diepreligieuze stylistically or thematically join currents of his time. In contrast to the serene work of his contemporaries went to the superb work of Bosch on fear, horror and disaster. 'His work Saturday full of strange, spooky elements. "He teaches,' elements for which no explanation was. They were fantasies. His work was surreal before it was invented surrealism. His imagination was the passage to another world. There are elements in his work there should not sit, inconsistencies, and that's precisely his work so much, so gripping. "He draws a parallel with Music Has The Right To Children, which naive kinderstemmetjes clash with atonal sounds, chrome beats and dissonant melodies. "Die kinderstemmetjes bring you your piece, they do not belong in such dark music. You do not know why they are there, they are just there. They suggest innocence, but also danger. You just do not know. But it takes you to. "
'If you could make paintings of what we feel on our plates happens, "says Mike, and he has apologies in advance for the claim that this ruling is decided,' would that whole surrealist works. 'There would be nothing to correct. And yet, you do not have to explain. "
Marcus: "If you need to explain, it is not art anymore."

Harnesses a plate with hidden messages about God and Satan and mortals that they believe envoy of either, and you will end with an altar. So Marcus called the previous album Geogaddi, an altar. He says the slightly watch. On the Internet circulate the wildest theories and analysis on the now three-year-old album. About David Koresh and his Branch Siege, to whom the number 1969 and the EP In A Beautiful Place Out In The Country would be dedicated (true). About the adaptation of the guilder cut and special številčenja as the Fibonacci series in notenschema and song (true). About links to the work of Bertold Brecht (nonsense). About samples of broadcasting spionagediensten in the Cold War (true). About satanisme (nonsense). About audio palindromen (the technique stands for nothing "). About the album, which like The Wild Earth would mean (stilzijgen). This last show also like to open. There is still something left to guess.
All these 'things', as Mike calls them, places the instrumental music in a context, they make a line, a concept, if you like. "As long as you believe in concept but not on a plate on the rules of chess."
On Geogaddi were things that sprung from the darkest krochten of their souls, in all their other plates and take them traced to a desire for their youth - the Leitmotiv of this story.
The lost youth, the days when life was simple and yet very lucky just as they search for. That heat. Nedolžnost. That feeling that every adolescent slowly lose. 'If I am depressed, and I have a long history of depression. "Bekent Mike. 'Then I always search for solace in my childhood. That sadness is always present in our music. "
One thing he still wants Geogaddi lost: 'It was a project, it's its own thing. A claustrophobic trip through a world full of paranoia and darkness. Many people confuse the plate with humans. We are not doomsayers. "
'Remember,' he says a little later, 'that we were in the studio when 9 / 11 happened. Over the last five months of Geogaddi coincided with the aftermath of 9 / 11. It was an anxious time, it felt as if we returned to the Cold War. Suddenly bekroop me again the fear that I felt as a child already had the atomic bomb. I think that everyone of our generation know that feeling. We izognejo not, the crowds our conscience. The tone was always beklemmender. The atmosphere, the samples, it has all to do with it, '' Moreover, 'he adds, "I myself went through a difficult period. It was a klotejaar. "

'Now, four years later,' the Marcus takes over, "which seems threat of 9 / 11 become permanent. The world seems permanently changed permanently insecure. More chaos and darkness and paranoia. If you do that day in and day out experience, go without saying you wonder how could we escape this? How can we forget that reality? "Mike:" Instead of going to do in the psychosis you can also zoken an excuse. "Coincidence or not, in the same period glad he listened to the first plate of positivo's The Polyphonic Spree . "I thought, I would also something hoopvols."
And so was the idea for The Campfire Headfase born: they would go back to the time when their music was still simple escapisme. Back to Twoism, with his mad debut singing sound. 'Twoism is probably the least political record that we have made. It is music to remove dreams. Even if your life zaniè hate you and your work, if you leave your plate design and carried away by the melodies, you forget all your misery. We have now also trying to create: a bubble in which you can take off and wegzweven. Away from everything. The new album has no secret agenda. The only thing he says is: fuck all this stuff, put the news from, say that klotebaan to make you get away from the city, take the time to go back to think of happier times. Everybody has one year in his head, the best summer of your life. That is our goal: we offer a window to the best summer of your life. "
Marcus: 'see it as a tool. A time machine. A private time. Our music is not working in the public space, it speaks to a listener at a time. It is in your own music to listen to. In order to crawl away. We offer you a safe haven. "
Mike: "A place to go."
Then Mike themselves suddenly realizes something: 'Now I look like thinking about that is something we take for granted, so much so that we can not imagine that there are people who would otherwise want to achieve something with their music. But many urban people who make music, whether it's R & B or something else, who think exactly the opposite. They almost say: What we do, it must be of this world. It must here and now represent, it should not deviate too much. It should be suitable for cultivation in Gap turned to be. Music is my escape from Gap. If I binnenloop clothing, I think soon: fucking hell, I would do something to someone calling, I have here as soon as possible road, back to my fantasy world. "

Back to the forests of the Pentland Hills. Back to his girlfriend and his daughter. And back to his brother. Because after some insist they want to admit: Mike Sandison and Marcus Eion his brothers. Eion - pronounced 'Ian - is Marcus' middle name. They have ten years kept secret. It does not matter, they found. The story is the music, not the people. The myth fades, the music continues.
Nobody knows them, nobody has ever seen it occur, no one has ever had an ad or a video clip or a TV action seen them (who are not), no one knows exactly what they are thinking, but 200,000 lonely souls recognize their silent grief. Their desire caused the most beautiful music of the last decade. Just ask Thom Yorke.

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